Does the CMB exist?

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One problem with science, or at least science developed by human beings, is that once a theory becomes established, it's very difficult to shift. Scientists who helped established this new theory move into senior positions. Once they're there, the last thing they want to do is openly accept that the theory they helped develop is wrong, even if its flaws become clear. If they did that, then the very reason for them being in their senior positions would be null and void, which would jeopardise their position, reputation, career and very attractive salary with non-contributory pension. Not surprisingly, many of them therefore fight tooth-and-nail to resist any ground-breaking changes in their field. This is why Max Planck, the Nobel-Prize-Winning physicist and father of quantum physics, said:

A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents, and making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it.'


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Entrenched views and positions aren't the only problems facing anyone trying to overhaul a scientific field. If a field is fundamentally wrong, then it is likely that some key experiments, ones that support its main theories, were originally wrong too. Somehow, someone made a mistake with the measurements, or interpreted the measurements incorrectly. According to the principles of science, if those experiments were wrong, then scientists in that field would soon discover their error when they carried out those experiments again. This is because any experiment should be reproducible, as in anyone should be able to do that experiment and get the same result.

What scientists don't often mention to everyone else is that many experiments aren't actually repeated, once they've been published in a scientific journal. Firstly, it costs money and repeating an experiments doesn't help anyone's career. Secondly, if an established theory is based on that experiment producing certain results, then no one wants to do the experiment again because everyone 'knows' what its result will be. Even if someone actually does the experiment, and then discovers that its result doesn't fit the established theory, then they often think they just made a mistake, or back off from reporting it because they're scared of looking foolish.

It's therefore easy for scientists to fall into a disastrous trap. If a key experiment was poorly carried out, or if the interpretations of its measurements were wrong, but its results still lead to a theory becoming established, then an entire field in science can go in the wrong direction and not get back on the right path… which leads us to the title of this article, 'does the CMB exist?' I've explained in my book, The Reality Problem, that there are serious problems with the Big Bang Theory. These problems are so large that the Big Bang Theory cannot be correct and serious mistakes have been made in putting it together.

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There are two key observations that underpin the Big Bang Theory. Firstly, when we look at other galaxies, they are all red-shifted, which seems to indicate that they are all moving away from each other, This was discovered by Edwin Hubble (although he didn't actually discover it, Vesto Slipher did, but that's another story). Secondly, Penzias and Wilson discovered that our entire universe has a temperature of three Kelvin; this is known as the Cosmic Microwave Background or CMB. If we put these two observations together, it would seem that our universe once started at one point and was full of heat and energy. Since that creation moment, our universe has expanded and cooled.

But the interpretation of the data from these two experiments could be wrong. Firstly, all galaxies may be redshifted, from our point of view, because the wavelength of the light has been elongated as it travelled such huge distances to reach us. The further it travels, the more it elongates, thus explaining the red-shift effect. Secondly, the 3K temperature that Penzias and Wilson detected may not be emitted by our entire universe, but simply from our planet. This is a perfectly reasonable idea, since our planet radiates heat. The way to check this out would be to measure the radiation in different places on our planet and especially in space. This is why the following video is very interesting:



Pierre-Marie Robitaille PhD, who makes these videos, is a skilled engineer. He is also clearly a clever guy. 'In 1998, he led the design and assembly of the world’s first Ultra High Field MRI System'. The fact that he isn't a senior astrophysicist doesn't necessarily count against him; neither was Einstein. Is he correct? I don't know for sure but I think it's extremely important that different views and theories are put forward. At the moment, organisations like CSICOP (now CSI) and RationalWiki are effectively witch-hunting any non-orthodox views, rather than explaining those theories' flaws, which is non-scientific. They'd be far more beneficial to society if they instead openly discussed the huge flaws in orthodox science, and what should be done about them.

Dr Robitaille has made many videos on topics in astrophysics. I also enjoyed the following video on the so-called 'first picture of a black hole', which filled the media for a few days. His explanation of how the physicists involved put together their picture from actual measurements is an eye-opener.



Personally, I think Dr Paul LaViolette's sub-quantum kinetics theory is a more solid explanation of the universe's creation and development than the official physics theories. Unfortunately, I think the only way we're going to be able to completely re-assess civilian physics on Earth, and find out which theory is correct, is after a major war, or the collapse of civilisation; the current, orthodox civilian views are just too entrenched. Dr LaViolette also has this view. By comparison, I think the USA military classified physics theories are probably spot-on. When you have a $500 billion dollar annual budget and the ability to hide anything you create, and the ability to classify anything any civilian creates, and you also work entirely on the basis of practical benefits, then you're bound to get ahead. It would be fascinating to get a glimpse of what the US military has created, and how their physicists understand the universe. Here's hoping…