Rumblings at the centre of our galaxy

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A very interesting astrophysics paper has been published this week, entitled 'Unprecedented Near-infrared Brightness and Variability of Sgr A*'. It reports that there has been a surge in electromagnetic emissions from the centre of our galaxy. Establishment physicists believe that there is a super-massive black-hole at the centre of our galaxy, known as Sagittarius A*, and the paper reports that the emissions of this object seem to be accelerating.

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The Guardian newspaper has written an article about this new report, which is very useful as it gives us some comments from the authors, as well as others in the field, and we don't have to pay to read it (unlike the science article itself, which is pay-to-view, even though it should be in the public domain… grrr). The article includes the comment:

“We have never seen anything like this in the 24 years we have studied the supermassive black hole,” said Andrea Ghez, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a senior author of the research. “It’s usually a pretty quiet, wimpy black hole on a diet. We don’t know what is driving this big feast.”


This isn't the only confusion about Sagittarius A*. There is another stellar object near Sagittarius A*, which is known as G2. Astronomers aren't clear what G2 is; some say it's a gas cloud, others say it's a star. The problem is that recently, G2 drifted very close to Sagittarius A*. It should have been mashed, or stretched out as it entered the gravity well of that huge, stellar object, except that it wasn't, it moved past seemingly unscathed. It would seem that the Sagittarius A* black hole, as the astrophysics have identified it, isn't behaving like a black hole. (For the record, some readers might be confused at how a black hole could be confused with a star, but because huge amounts of dust and gas block our view of the centre of our galaxy, it isn't easy to see what's there)

The official physics description of Sagittarius A* therefore seems to be a mess but there is another physics theory which explains its current behaviour very clearly. Dr Paul LaViolette thinks that Einstein's Relativity is wrong, that there is an ether and that our universe is continually being seeded by new matter, especially where concentrations of matter already exist. His theories are fascinating, logical and solve many existing physics problems, some of which I discuss in my book 'How science shows…' I heartily recommend his book Subquantum Kinetics. It's not an easy read and requires some understanding of physics principles, but it's hugely thought-provoking.

Dr LaViolette explains that the centre of our galaxy doesn't contain black holes, since black holes can't exist (which would explain why physicists still can't resolve Einstein's Relativity and Quantum Physics when it comes to black holes). Instead, our galaxy's centre contains huge hyperon stars, which are made of vast amounts of matter. Since new matter is being formed at the centre of these stars, continually, they will inevitably get bigger and more exotic, like Przybylski's Star, until they eventually explode, emitting vast amounts of matter and energy in the process. According to Dr LaViolette's calculations, there is a huge burst from the centre of our galaxy every 12,800 years. This burst is so large that it sends out a wave of energy, matter and dust, outwards, throughout the Milky Way, affecting all star-systems on the way. The gravity wave that accompanies this burst is so strong that it has entrained the axial spin of our planet. This is why our planet's precessional cycle (the time take for the axis of our planet to go around in a circle) is exactly twice the time between eruptions because our planet has been entrained to align on its N/S, then S/N orientation with the centre of the galaxy at each eruption event. As Dr LaViolette explains in his book Earth Under Fire, the last time we were hit by this wave, and thereby bombarded by meteorite and swamped with cosmic dust, was approximately 12,800 years ago, when the Younger Dryas Impact Event occurred.

In previous articles on this website, I've explained that there seems to ancient warnings that another catastrophic stellar event is imminent. The ancient site at Gobleki Tepi is one example. Another is an ancient Mesopotamian legend. Dr LaViolette's theories give a scientific explanation as to why we've been given these warnings. Worryingly, the evidence reported in this week's science paper on the increasing activity of Sagittarius A* fully supports the idea that the massive objects at the centre of our galaxy are getting ready to explode. At the end of the guardian article, the author writes:

The black hole is about 26,000 light years from Earth and poses no danger to our planet.


Unfortunately, this may be completely untrue. What we may be seeing is more akin to the rumblings of a volcano, shortly before it erupts. If Dr LaViolette's theories are correct, and Sag A* does explode (or in fact has exploded, considering the light is 26,000 years old), then we'll soon get the wave of light, dust and energy from that massive, stellar eruption. Its source might be 26,000 light-years distant to us, but the gravity-energy wave would be directly behind the light we're seeing now. It's a grim prospect; the last time we were hit, it was the end of civilisation.