Adapting a normal car to run on hydrogen

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One important hurdle that we all need to overcome, in our path to stop the worse effects of climate change, is our use of gasoline-burning cars. Nearly all the cars in the world run on fossil fuels, which is a bad thing, and there are an awful lot of them. It would be much better if they ran on something else, such as electric batteries or hydrogen, created by renewable energy. Not only would this reduce fossil fuel use, it would also reduce air pollution.

Unfortunately, there seems to be big problems with us all switching to renewable-powered cars. For starters, we'd have to build a whole load of new cars and scrap the existing ones. Secondly, if they were battery-powered, we'd have to make a lot of batteries, which aren't environmentally friendly. We might instead try to use hydrogen-powered cars but if we did that, we'd have to construct hydrogen storage tanks and pumps at all our petrol stations… or at least, that's the commonly held belief. But what if we could simply convert normal, gasoline or petrol-powered cars to run on hydrogen? That is the subject of the following video. It has an annoyingly deceptive title, 'car that runs on water' when in fact it runs on hydrogen created from water using electrolysis, but it's still well worth watching.

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The video stars Bob Lazar. He came to fame in UFO circles after talking openly about his work at Area 51, and his experiences working on 'flying saucers' or UFOs. People in the UFO community are divided about Bob's testimony. Some think it is correct and others think he is supply false testimony, to confuse and discredit the whole subject. My personal feeling, over the years, is that Bob is a clever, sincere and brave man, but I am sceptical that some of the information he has passed on is correct, not through his own duplicity, but because he was fed false information by people at Area 51. Lazar's reported description of element 115 and its use in advanced anti-gravity ships is, I think, a complete red-herring. It has been created to disguise the fact, as explained by Eric Laithwaite, Nikola Tesla, Paul LaViolette, Thomas Townsend-Brown, John Searle and others, that charge distribution and circular motion in a metal body is enough to generate a gravitational effect. The theoretical underpinning for this phenomenon is described in Dr LaViolette's book, sub quantum kinetics.

This 'create confusion' tactic was were developed in the Second World War by the Allies, and probably earlier. More recently, it has been used in the matter of UFOs, aliens, exotic technology etc. Back in the 1940's, those wartime classified departments realised that just hiding something was too simple an approach. Instead, it was better to hide important material but also to create false material. In this way, any investigators searching for the truth would think they'd found something.They'd finish their work, satisfied, but in fact they'd been duped and they were actually worse off than before.

Returning to the matter of adapting a car to run on hydrogen, Bob Lazar shows that this isn't a difficult process. He has already adapted his Corvette to run on hydrogen, which he creates overnight with an electrolysis unit using mains water and a solar-power array. Unfortunately, there's a catch; Bob explains in the video that a special hydride, a chemical, is needed in the storage process. This hydride has been marked classified by the U.S. government and can't be bought. Lazar got around this problem by making the hydride himself.

How accurate are Lazar's claims? Is it practically achievable to alter a car to run on hydrogen? I don't know but it's definitely worth investigating. This is the first time I've heard of someone adapting a normal, petrol or gasoline-powered car to run on hydrogen but, in principle, it should be do-able. A car's engine is simply a metal case containing set of cavities in which a fuel is burnt. The expansion of the gases created by the burning pushes a piston around, thereby turning the car's wheels. Hydrogen should work just as well as petrol, as they're both chemicals being oxidised. I can imagine all sorts of technical issues but in principle, it's a sound idea.

The idea of adapting existing cars to run on hydrogen is brilliant from a climate-change and environmental perspective. We don't have to trash all our existing cars and we still get clean cars that can run on renewable power. I can see that the major car manufacturers wouldn't be very interested in this, as no one's buying a new car. Also, the safety people might have a lot to say about a car that's had hydrogen tanks fitted to it, but I would say that's better that staying with fossil fuels, which are destroying our planet's climate, polluting our cities and will eventually decimate the human race. Hopefully, we'll hear more on this subject soon.