Memory of water documentary

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There is a very good documentary about the research work of Dr Benveniste and Dr Luc Montagnier on Youtube at the moment. I've written about Luc Montagnier before, when exploring the science behind homeopathy, and how the memory of water theory links to DNA's fascinating property of acting as a fractal antennae, both receiving and sending electromagnetic signals of different frequencies. Up to now, I've only encountered information about Dr Montagnier in the pages of New Scientist magazine, and so it's been great to watch a documentary in which he explains his work, his theories and what he discovered. Here it is:



As the documentary explains, Benveniste and Montagnier's work was pilloried by the scientific establishment and publicly declared to be bunk, and yet in the documentary, Montagnier proves that water does have an electromagnetic memory.

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To show that water has a memory, Montagnier performed a double-bind trial with the help of professors in Italy and in front of the cameras. To start with, in France, an analysed sample of DNA was placed in water. That water was then progressively diluted, shaken before each new dilution in a way similar to homeopathy preparations. The result, virtually entirely pure water, was then read by a 'electromagnetic microphone', in order to pick up the electromagnetic signals it was emitting. The signal was stored in a digital file and that data was then sent to Italy, where a second sample of water was irradiated electromagnetically by a device, using the data file. Laboratory biochemists then applied a DNA recombination process to that sample of water. The recombination process worked and produced DNA, even though there 'should' have been nothing in the sample but pure water. Analysis of that created DNA showed that it matched the original DNA sample in France to a 98% accuracy. This was all done while following scrupulous scientific methods by professors int multiple departments in multiple countries.

Scientifically, therefore, Montagnier showed conclusively that cellular activity is not a chemical process but an electromagnetic process. In any volume of water, DNA transmits the electromagnetic signal of its molecular structure. These signals are stored in nano-scale water structures around the DNA. These nano-scale structures will re-transmit the signal when agitated, creating more copies of themselves in the surrounding water. This is why the recombinant enzyme produced new DNA from the water sample in the PCR process, because it clearly needs only the electromagnetic signal to create a new DNA structure. It doesn't matter to the recombinant enzyme if that signal comes from a physical DNA structure or from a transmitting, nano-scale water structure; it's the electromagnetic signal that counts. It's a brilliant discovery. For Montagnier and Dr Fritz-Albert Popp, among others, this is not shocking news, but for biologists and biochemists in general, it certainly is.

There are many ramifications to this fundamental insight. For example, DNA can be seen primarily as a storage of the cellular blueprint when there is no water around. As soon as water is present, the DNA blueprint signal must spread everywhere in the body, as DNA is an ideal fractal electromagnetic transmitter antenna. Also, enzymes reading DNA information don't need to visit the nucleus as the signal is everywhere in the cell, for the water in the cell must contain vast numbers of the nano-scale structures storing the DNA-electromagnetic-fingerprint.

In addition, infections by viruses and bacteria do not require the actual physical bacterium to enter the host's body, but only that water with the bacterium's electromagnetic fingerprint enter the host's body. Boiled and frozen water is not a problem in this situation, as the signal is lost when the water changes state, but liquid water contaminated by the bacterium's electromagnetic signal would be a problem.

The implications of this discovery are vast. Medicine would enter a new era, where doctors only require a digital file of the right medicine, an electromagnetic transmitter and some water to treat someone. To diagnose, all they would need to do would be to take an electromagnetic reading of the patient's fluids. There would be no need for mass manufacturing of pills, expensive scanners etc. Of course, the pharmaceutical and medical equipment industries would lose vast amounts of profits if this new paradigm became established, and they're not know for their selfless compassion. They are though known for their wealth, self-serving attitude and general ruthlessness. One doesn't need to be a Nobel-Prize-Winner, like Luc Montagnier, to work out what they would do. Sadly, the sickness doesn't just lie with the patients.

Climate Change scientists' thoughts on the future

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Climate change is accelerating on Earth. Its acceleration is clear here in London, where the temperature yesterday was 22 degrees Celsius. Normally, a Mid-October day in London should be cold (around 12-14 degrees) with rain; it would be time to put on the coat and scarf and dig out a pair of gloves. Instead, it was so warm yesterday that I had to take my summer shorts out of my winter storage bag and put them back on again. This is just one more day in a year, in London, of frankly bizarre weather. After a weirdly freezing March, a drought set in in the South-East of England because a weather system stayed over Ireland and Western Scotland, funnelling warm air to the hot Arctic. That weather system, created by a virtually stationary jet-stream, left London and the South-East of England to bake for months. Although hurricanes are getting the headlines, with good reason, I think 2018's weather in England is just as ominous an event.

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Unfortunately, the British press is still giving scant coverage to our accelerating climate change catastrophe but there are television articles being broadcast in other countries. Below is a very good one from Australia. I wanted to put it in this blog because its climate scientists talk about our future in real terms. They know what's coming and they are worrying whether they should have children, because those children will experience its full ferocity. They are planning where they can live in a hotter world, and which countries they'll be allowed to move to, in order to escape deathly heatwaves. These are questions that we all need to be asking now.

It's true that discussions about stopping climate change are going on in the press now, but they are far too late and are connected with no concrete action. Also, there are discussions about reducing the climate change effect to a manageable level but these are based on wildly optimistic predictions and they also have no concrete action connected with them either. Tragically, the opportunity to stop catastrophic global climate change has gone. Feedback mechanisms, such as our warming arctic and the accompanying methane release, are now accelerating global warming forward, like a runaway train on a hill. This is no longer a time for discussion about what to do about stopping climate change. The only valid questions to ask now are 'who will survive what's to come' and 'how will they do it'?



Big brains, baldness and a hybrid

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A while back, I read a very interesting scientific paper published in the prestigious science journal Cell. The authors of the paper studied the differences in the DNA between humans, primates and rodents, all mammals but species with significantly different behaviour. The authors found that the genetic changes needed for humans to have their bigger brains, and for those brains to work, include an extensive and specialised set of genetic alterations. What's more, humans have gained all those required genetic changes in a very short time, genetically speaking.

What especially caught my eye in this paper was how often the word 'remarkable' was used. Scientific papers are almost always dry, sober reports, their authors do not want to sound emotional and flighty, and so it is illuminating that the authors saying remarkable in two particular paragraphs. Here they are:

“It has long been noted that brains of various extant and extinct primates display remarkable variation in size, organization, and behavioral output (Noback and Montagna, 1970; Armstrong and Falk, 1982; Byrne and Whiten, 1988; Matsuzawa, 2001). This is particularly true for the evolutionary lineage leading from ancestral primates to humans, in which the increase in brain size and complexity was remarkably rapid and persistent throughout the lineage (Jerison, 1973; Walker et al., 1983).” Page 1.

“It is remarkable that 17 out of the 24 primate-fast outliers [rare or exceptional genetic changes] are linked to the regulation of either brain size or behavior.”

The third ‘remarkable’ is of special significance, for it touches upon a very strange story.

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According to the official line, based on Darwin's Theory of Evolution, homo sapiens (us) naturally evolved from Homo Erectus in about one million years. They in turn evolved from Homo Erectus in about one million years. Homo Erectus had a brain capacity of 850 cm³ and Homo Habilis had a brain capacity of 600 cm³. Chimpanzees have a brain capacity of up to 500 cm³. Humans, the last in line of these species, have a brain capacity of roughly 1400 cm³.

This sounds, at first glance, to be a reasonable progress of development. Bigger brains enable tool use, group coordination, planning etc. The only problem is that the odds of gaining the required genetic changes to have these big brains through natural selection, in the time described, are vanishingly small.
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DNA, fractal antennae and Sirius

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Last week, I stumbled upon a science paper published in the International Journal in Radiation Biology, entitled ‘DNA is a fractal antenna in electromagnetic fields’. The paper’s abstract (or concise overview) is as follows:

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PURPOSE: To review the responses of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to electromagnetic fields (EMF) in different frequency ranges, and characterise the properties of DNA as an antenna.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined published reports of increased stress protein levels and DNA strand breaks due to EMF interactions, both of which are indicative of DNA damage. We also considered antenna properties such as electronic conduction within DNA and its compact structure in the nucleus.

RESULTS: EMF interactions with DNA are similar over a range of non-ionising frequencies, i.e., extremely low frequency (ELF) and radio frequency (RF) ranges. There are similar effects in the ionising range, but the reactions are more complex.

CONCLUSIONS: The wide frequency range of interaction with EMF is the functional characteristic of a fractal antenna, and DNA appears to possess the two structural characteristics of fractal antennas, electronic conduction and self symmetry. These properties contribute to greater reactivity of DNA with EMF in the environment, and the DNA damage could account for increases in cancer epidemiology, as well as variations in the rate of chemical evolution in early geologic history.


In other words, the researchers found that DNA is a lot like a radio antenna, in that it can pick up electromagnetic signals, which then alter its behaviour. What’s more, DNA also has loops within loops, which means it can pick up electromagnetic signals in multiple frequencies.

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Fractal antennae are used in the telecommunications industry because such a design enables an antenna to be compact and also be able to respond to multiple frequencies. Traditional antennae were usually designed, and built, to pick up a narrow range of signals, which was often all that was needed. In the modern world of complex multi-band transmission, fractal antennae are a very tempting, space-saving and multi-tasking alternative.

There are many thought-provoking potential consequences to our DNA being fractal antennae. For starters, as the above paper mentions, there are ‘published reports of increased stress protein levels and DNA strand breaks due to EMF interactions, both of which are indicative of DNA damage.’ In other words, there’s evidence that our DNA is very sensitive to e/m signals and will actually suffer damage if the wrong signals are beamed at it. There is an awful lot of radio-frequency traffic in our world today, particular from wireless or phone masts, and there’s evidence that it’s not good for biological organisms, as this science paper states. To be honest, the logical thing to do would be to develop a full understanding of radio-frequency signals on the DNA of living creatures first, and then stick up masts everywhere, but that’s clearly not happening.

There is another thought-provoking consequence to the above paper, something that no one has talked about yet, as far as I know. According to the science paper mentioned at the beginning of this article, DNA is surprisingly good at picking up RF and ELF signals and then altering its own functioning as a result. Not surprisingly, hitting DNA with crude or random RF signals of high intensity will trigger damage within the DNA. This is a lot like hitting a set of skilfully arrange tuning forks with very loud notes of random frequency. A lot of the time nothing will happen and some of the time a fork will overload and smash to bits.

But what if we knew exactly what RF signals to send? If that was the case, we could beam a host of carefully chosen RF signals at the DNA and it wouldn’t just do nothing, or break. Would it instead play like a musical instrument? Would it alter its genetic information in a specific way? Would it produce specific proteins, neurotransmitters or perhaps even viruses? Read More...

'You can't tell the people' - UFO book review

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A while back, I reviewed a couple of books on possibly the most famous UFO incident in the U.K. the Rendlesham Forest incident. According to many witnesses and military memoranda released under the Freedom of Information Act, an unidentified craft of mysterious design and using even stranger technology visited the Rendlesham Forest on the edge of a U.S. Air force base in Suffolk, England in the Christmas week in 1980. It either crash-landed or crashed and then landed in those pine woods in the middle of the night, causing a major alert involving the U.S. Air Force, the Suffolk police, local villagers and others.

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All the books I’ve read so far about the incident have been interesting. 'Left at East Gate' by Larry Warren, is a very interesting and personal account of the event by someone who experienced it, but it isn’t a comprehensive study, more of an autobiography. The best book on the incident, I think, is ‘You can’t tell the people’ by Georgina Bruni.

You Can’t Tell the People is a big book and there were several times when I skimmed pages. Bruni is very thorough in her investigation and clearly talks to many of the key players many times as she gathers the relevant evidence. It’s easy to lose count of the number of senior military, police and civilian figures she talks to. Eventually, it becomes obvious that certain things happened in Rendlesham Forest on the last week of 1980: Read More...

New sci-fi short story - 'Tags'

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Just a quick note to say that I've added a new science-fiction short story called 'Tags' to this website. In the story, a UK professor, working in a top-secret government lab, discovers one night that the star 'Sirius', normally calm and blue-white in the sky, has somehow turned red and flaming. He's immediately called back to his lab because his bosses have discovered something else, that the star's red and flaming light is an interstellar laser beam that a civilisation on a planet around the star has fired at Earth. What's even more important is that the laser beam has carried a virus to Earth.

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The story draws upon two non-fiction articles I've written and published on this website, Laser beam from Sirius and Evolution and Alien Viruses. Hope you enjoy it! :-)

Electromagnetic resonance of the Great Pyramid

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Last month, a scientific paper was published in the Journal of Applied Physics that showed that the Great Pyramid concentrates and resonates electromagnetic radiation, in particular radio waves in the 250m-wavelength range. The authors, Mikhail Balezin, Kseniia V. Baryshnikova, Polina Kapitanova, and Andrey B. Evlyukhin explain in their paper that by modelling the Great Pyramid, in an albeit simplified form, they found that it naturally can 'collect and concentrate electromagnetic energy'. The image below shows the results of the modelling and how the e-m radiation intensifies within and beneath the pyramid.


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Gobekli Tepe, the Fox and the End of Days

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Gobekli Tepe is a strange, ancient, enigmatic temple in Turkey. According to the evidence, it was constructed in 8,000 BC or thereabouts, long before Sumer even officially began as a civilisation. The site consists of a series of sunken, circular chambers or pits, containing upright stone blocks, most placed around the edge of the pit but a few placed in the centre of the pit. The structure of Gobekli Tepe indicates that it was an astronomical observatory, similar to Stonehenge.

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Recently, Dr Martin Sweatman published a scientific paper that puts forward the idea that one of the stones at Gobekli Tepe, popularly referred to as the Vulture Stone, does in fact mark a date in our calendar. The stone contains several animals, seemingly positioned carefully around a globe. Drawing upon theories developed by Andrew Collins, Sweatman confirms that if the central globe in the Vulture Stone carving is assumed to be the sun and the animals around it represent certain constellations, then the Vulture Stone relief is marking a particular date in history. This is possible to do because the stars in our sky change their positions over millennia, due to celestial precession, performing a great circle in the sky every 25,800 years. Once we know that, we pinpoint the date that such an alignment would occur.

The date that Sweatman (and Collins) think the Vulture Stone is marking is 10,900 BC. This is a very important date because it is the date of the Younger Dryas Impact Event, when a cloud of meteorites is said to have hit the Earth, causing massive wildfires and a sudden cooling of our planet, which extended our ice-age another thousand years-or-so, before its final, catastrophic ending in 9,650 BC.

I recently wrote an article explaining how the Great Sphinx could also be a physical marker of the Younger Dryas Impact Event. The Great Sphinx was probably a Great Lion originally, and its positioning, in relation to celestial alignment, indicates that it was built to mark the date 10,900 BC, the dawning of the Age of Leo. It therefore seems that at least one ancient civilisation wanted to tell us how important 10,900 BC was in the history of our species and that of Earth. If the Younger Dryas Impact theory is correct, this is understandable, as that ancient date was when a global, cataclysmic event occurred. Read More...