Who's prepared to survive climate change?

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In the last few weeks, I've been writing about climate change and how human beings are going to survive on our planet in the future. The recent disasters in Queensland, Australia, where cattle farmers, after years of drought, have suffered livestock-destroying floods, show that farming outdoors will become increasingly difficult and eventually impossible in a climate-changed Earth. Australia has become one of the main countries that is suffering the first impacts of serious climate change. It has been suffering records temperatures, temperatures so high that its fish are dying in its rivers and its bats and marsupials are falling dead from its trees.

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If we follow the current, accelerating temperature changes, in fifty years time, no one will be able to survive outdoors in Australia for any significant length of time and the vast majority of its agriculture will be gone.

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The Blue Man Group and Venus Hum - I feel love

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I don't mention music much on this website, mostly because I think there are bigger issues that need discussing, but I found this performance of the classic Donna Summer hit 'I feel love' by The Blue Man Group and Venus Hum on vocals. I've watched it six times in two days, because it's just plain awesome.



P.s. if anyone's interested, here are my top 828 songs (in alphabetical order). I know it's a strange number, but they're all the ones in my record collection that got a star. The funny thing is, when I play them on random selection, I still feel that there's not enough of them but that's okay. We may be screwing up our planet but some of us have produced the most wonderful music; that's something to treasure.

1999, Prince, 1999
(Don't Fear) The Reaper, Blue Öyster Cult, Don't Fear the Reaper: The Best of Blue Öyster Cult
(Nothing But) Flowers, Talking Heads, Once In A Lifetime
(Still A) Weirdo, KT Tunstall, Tiger Suit (Deluxe Edition)
2000 miles, Pretenders, Best Of
4 seasons in one day, Crowded House, Woodface
50 ways to leave your lover, Paul Simon, Best Of
59th Street bridge song, Simon and Garfunkel, Best Of
99 Red balloons, Nena, Best Of
A hard rain's a-gonna fall, Bob Dylan, The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan
A hazy shade of winter, Simon and Garfunkel, Bookends
A Little Less Conversation (JXL Radio Edit Remix), Elvis Presley, Elvis 30 #1 Hits
A little respect, Wheatus, Best Of
A message to you, Rudy, Specials. The, Best Of

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How saving the planet can bring happiness

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Climate change is accelerating. If we don’t do something drastic soon, akin to a War-Effort, where agriculture is transformed to feed the population in the most land-efficient way (i.e. no beef), petrol is rationed, non-emergency flights are banned etc, we’re all screwed. Unfortunately, there’s no sign at all that the powers-that-be have any interest in doing this, or encouraging the general population to make such sacrifices. There are ways that some of us could survive, but even they're not being developed.

Fortunately, we, as individuals, still have the freedom to do the right thing and reduce our contribution to climate change. This is good news because climate change isn’t just a collective challenge, it’s a personal challenge and we can’t escape that. We’ve come into this world and we have the freedom to make choices and those choices stay with us; we will know what we did. There will be no absolution, no priestly forgiveness if we chicken out of our obligations. If we choose to not make an effort to help save our planet, because we like fancy goods and cheap holidays abroad and a big car etc, then in the future, when we see the devastation of our planet caused by such selfish decisions, we are going to hate ourselves. No one can escape this result. Any attempts to argue that our personal efforts are irrelevant don't work. To show the truth of this, here's an example:

A colleague once said to me 'what's the point of limiting my carbon footprint, there's seven billion people on this planet, it makes no difference!' I replied, 'so it's okay then if I kill you?' He was shocked and said 'no, of course not!' I replied that according to his logic, he's only one of seven billion people, so it's irrelevant if I kill him or not. He didn’t like the argument but it’s still true. His life might seem irrelevant on a global scale, but it’s still precious to him. In the same way, our efforts to help save our planet are very important to us. Read More...

Domed habitats - a reply to Scientists Warning .org

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This week, ScientistsWarning.org (who I talked about in the previous blog) emailed me and asked if I had anything to contribute to their cause. I don't think they were emailing me specifically, but it seemed a good opportunity to talk to them about our future on this planet, now that climate change is accelerating. I wanted particularly to put forward ideas of how to deal with our stormy future, and how to survive it. Here's my email to them:

Hello,

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Thank you for emailing me, asking for my feedback. Yes, I would like to contribute. I am a writer and illustrator, and I’ve been doing my best, for over a decade, to educate people on the critical issue of climate change. I’ve also tried to combine humour and facts to get the message across. For example, in 2012, I warned about arctic methane and pointed out to readers of my website that the climate would get so bad that we’d all have to end up being troglodytes or cave-dwellers. I came up with the slogan shown.

Unfortunately. I think we are now too far down the climate-catastrophe path for amusing slogans, media campaigns, political lobbying on renewables and suchlike. The tipping points have been passed and it’s clear the fossil-fuel banking system has adopted a ‘business as usual until martial law is declared’ approach.

Instead, I think we need to start planning how some of us are going to survive beyond 2100. The only communities that will survive on Earth in the next century will be ones either living underground or in domed habitats. Therefore, it is vital that we begin a process of making sure that there are domed habitats to move into. Read More...

Scientistswarning.org talk

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At the bottom of this blog entry is a video made by the ScientistsWarning.org organisation. Unlike the IPPC reports, whose predictions are often watered down in order to be allowed into the official pronouncements (such as the rate of warming of our oceans), ScientistsWarning talks frankly about what's to come. This talk references an interview with Mayer Hillman, 'an 86-year-old social scientist and senior fellow emeritus of the Policy Studies Institute', which I also definitely recommend. Hillman is straightforward and blunt. As it says in the article:

"Although Hillman has not flown for more than 20 years as part of a personal commitment to reducing carbon emissions, he is now scornful of individual action which he describes as “as good as futile”. By the same logic, says Hillman, national action is also irrelevant “because Britain’s contribution is minute. Even if the government were to go to zero carbon it would make almost no difference.”

Instead, says Hillman, the world’s population must globally move to zero emissions across agriculture, air travel, shipping, heating homes – every aspect of our economy – and reduce our human population too. Can it be done without a collapse of civilisation? “I don’t think so,” says Hillman. “Can you see everyone in a democracy volunteering to give up flying? Can you see the majority of the population becoming vegan? Can you see the majority agreeing to restrict the size of their families?”

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Paradox by Jim Al-Khalili - book review

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Paradoxes are fascinating things, 'a seemingly absurd or contradictory statement or proposition which when investigated may prove to be well founded or true.' In this book, Jim Al-Khalili talks about scientific and statistical paradoxes. They are:

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1) The quantum physics paradox of Schrodinger's Cat.
2) The intelligence and entropy conundrum of Maxwell's demon.
3) The existence of aliens conundrum of Fermi's Paradox.
4) The predictability paradox of Laplace's Demon.
5) Olber's Paradox, which is 'if the universe in infinite, why is the sky dark?'

Jim also adds in a few relativity paradoxes and a statistical paradox (the game show goats and car problem) to round off the list.

I am a big fan of popular science books; I find the good ones fascinating and they're a great way to learn about our universe. Unfortunately, our scientific establishment pushes a Scientific Materialist line. In other words, all 'thought' and 'life' is simply an illusory phenomena that comes about by the action of physical mechanisms.

As I've explained in many articles on this website, in particular the influence idea, as well as in my book how science shows that almost everything important we've been told is wrong, Scientific Materialism is scientifically impossible. Minds and spirits have to exist in order for living things to defy the law of entropy, for living things are constantly increasing order in the universe, when the Law of Entropy states that all physical things should become more disordered over time. Read More...

Big Premonition Experiment - Update

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It's now the 12th of January and it looks as if my vivid dream's prediction of an explosion/eruption and a large cloud of black smoke in the first few days of 2019 isn't going to happen, which is a huge relief. When I read in late December that Anak Krakatoa and Mount Etna were both active, and that Anak Krakatoa had created a devastating tsunami, I was very worried that a huge eruption would take place. Fortunately, it hasn't.

What does this say about my vivid dream? So far, it would seem that the dream was just a dream. Some readers might point out that I had the dream a year-and-a-half ago and that the timing of a volcanic eruption is chaotic in nature. In other words, that small shifts over time in weather systems, acting upon each other, could alter when a destruction occurs; the so-called 'Butterfly Effect'. This would mean that the time of an eruption is fundamentally unknowable, even using psi-awareness, until close to when it actually happens. I don't know if that's true. Personally, I am defaulting to a conservative viewpoint. Unless new evidence arises, I'm concluding that my dream wasn't prescient.

Unfortunately, I don't think this lets us off the hook in terms of the likelihood of a future disaster. Climate change now seems unstoppable, according to all the scientific evidence. We should definitely therefore be planning how we're going to survive on an inhospitable Earth. We need to start constructing protective environments for ourselves and our crops, not necessarily to survive in immediately, but part of a long-term development of our survival strategy. Read More...

'Magicians of the Gods' book review

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My Christmas Holiday reading this year has been 'Magicians of the Gods' by Graham Hancock. Over the last couple of decades, Hancock has written a lot of very interesting books on Giza, Atlantis, South America and related topics and has been one of the leading lights working to promote the idea that Atlantis, or at least and advanced antediluvian civilisation, did exist but was wiped out at the end of our last ice-age. Fortunately for us, some of its inhabitants survived and helped re-start civilisation around the globe and the remains of those ancient civilisation are still present today in various sites, such as in South America, Egypt, Turkey, Indonesia and Australia.

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In Magicians of the Gods, Hancock puts forward evidence that an advanced antediluvian civilisation did exist on Earth in our last ice-age but was wiped out by the Younger Dryas impact, then a massive flood a thousand years after that terrible event, which also ended the ice-age, leaving Earth with a sea level far higher than before, thus drowning many ancient cities. A lot the related material has appeared in previous Hancock books, and so anyone who has read his previous books will be tempted to skim some pages of this one; I certainly did. In the end, I did enjoy 'Magicians of the Gods' but I think it added little new material to the topic that I hadn't heard before. I do still recommend it but perhaps it's more appropriate for someone just entering the whole topic of Atlantis.

I think it's also worth noting what Graham Hancock hasn't put in his book. Most importantly, Hancock is completely committed to the idea that the Younger Dryas Impact Event was caused by a periodic comet, akin to Halley's Comet. He mentions the Taurids and how our solar system's movement around our galactic centre brings us into regions of dense material, which trigger cometary events. Read More...